? There’s a moment you know, you’re f-

June 26, 2016

still life

Isn’t this a nice scene while the country is falling down around our ears? Here, have some coffee and a bit of this peanut butter chocolate square (v. tasty).

If you woke up on the morning after the referendum, looked at your phone, and your first reaction was ‘I’m sorry, what?’, then your next reaction may have been to go straight on social media and vent about it.

Much like me. Much like most of my politically-minded friends.

There’s a lot to be said about social media bubbles. They engender a certain level of ignorance, they reflect our prejudices and privileges…and they give us a space to say, ‘oh thank God, you too?’ when something happens that is monumental to us. They also are terrible places for genuine discourse, and often incredibly binary and simplistic. We, all of us, know we’re unlikely to ever change anyone’s mind with a facebook ‘debate’. That doesn’t stop us trying.

I’ve seen a lot of cries of ‘sour grapes!’ from Leave voters who now think the Remain camp are just, well, making a bit of a fuss about the fact they lost this razor-thin vote that may indelibly affect their lives, and they should just essentially shut up and ‘accept’ it. Given the magnitude of what has happened and is continuing to happen, as the two main British political parties are essentially eating themselves right now, I think it is more than justified to be angry.

Even moreso as clips emerge of voters who voted ‘as a protest’ and ‘didn’t think their vote would count’ and ‘would vote remain’ if they could do it again.

Even moreso as evidence of racist behaviour across the UK is surfacing in the aftermath.

Even moreso as those of us who were forced to watch the Leave team conduct a horrifying campaign based on absolute lies, that preyed on xenophobia, and had no genuine ideas for what would happen if we left, now have to watch them turncoat hours after they win and refute that BS ‘£350 million a week to the NHS’ claim, refute the idea that we could possibly go forward without free movement of labour.

Even moreso, when you hear that many leave voters were upset with issues that had absolutely nothing to do with the EU, and also which leaving might make worse. By the way, if article 50 is actually invoked, let’s all enjoy continuing to pay the membership fee you all hated in order to be able to trade with the EU and yet have sweet FA say in the laws they will enact, or enjoy the realisation that we will be unable to stop free movement of people. By the end of it all – if article 50 is invoked – we will literally have done the exact opposite of ‘taking back our country’, whatever that meant in the first place.

When you think about it, if the 48% of the 72.2% who voted and lost weren’t angry, then there’d be something massively wrong with our society in general.

But no, it’s definitely sour grapes, because look at that petition they set up to try and force a 2nd referendum! Pfft. Can’t they just get over the fact they lost?

I’m not personally for a second referendum, but does it change your mind about the derided petition to know that it was set up by a Leave voter a month or so ago, because he thought they were going to lose? Or that Farage said back in May that he would fight for a second referendum because a 52-48 referendum win for the Remain camp would be ‘unfinished business by a long way’? (But now that he’s won, “it isn’t a best of three scenario”?)

But isn’t the worst of it the fact that those people who directed their anger at a lack of jobs, opportunity and perceived failings within the country’s social security safety nets, are now going to get a government that couldn’t give less of a crap about them or their feelings on these subjects? We’ll soon wake up to Prime Minister Boris Johnson and his cabinet, with our only hope being that Nicola Sturgeon can somehow outmanoeuvre the Brexit. Or perhaps, as the media seem to feel Boris Johnson didn’t actually want a Leave win anyway, it could be the out he (or whoever ends up in that chair) needs in order to not have to invoke Article 50 and come away with some semblance of ‘dignity’ in tact.

Friday’s news has sent me, and most of those in my immediate circle, spinning through several stages of grief. Instantly I wanted to, online, push the space out around me to protect those stages of sadness and anger and denial in the direct aftermath of the news. If you’re keeping a more level head about it, then good for you. We’ll need that in the coming months. But in the immediate fallout of the vote, after a campaign that was so devoid of facts that the Pro-Brexit camp stated that they’d “had enough of experts” (and people actually went with them on that), I am holding square on mine (and other people’s) need to let it all out. There are many various forms of unfollowing and off switches you could push if you don’t want to hear it; it is that simple.

So here I am saying I’m sad for the state of our country right now; I’m sad for the racism that’s coming to the fore, I’m sad that we have no effective leadership in either main party, I’m sad that the drop in the pound makes my life that bit more difficult, I’m sad that people are googling ‘what is the EU?’ too late, I’m sad that the media bile is more readily accessed than informed and reasoned websites like FullFact.org, I’m sad for the people who thought they were voting for something completely different than they have woken up to.

I wish I knew what I could do to help.

But until then, we watch and wait, and eat peanut butter squares and get a sugar rush and blog about it. And hope that if it does all implode, something better can rise from the ashes.

 

2 thoughts on “? There’s a moment you know, you’re f-

  1. May

    I’m enjoying perusing through your blog. The outcome of the EU referendum was devastating! I, and I assume many others, underestimated the public’s tenacity for change when it came to our relationship with the EU. It is also disappointing how the Labour Party is in complete disarray. It is now more than ever that this country needs a strong socialist voice within parliament…yep I’m also very much into politics! :)

    I also wanted to add that you’ve got a great eye for photography. The wooden tray in the above photo is really nice, would you happen to remember where you purchased it?

    Keep blogging! x

    Reply
    1. Laura Tosney Post author

      Thank you May! And thank you for taking the time to comment – it’s much appreciated :) I’m pretty sure I got it on Amazon, by searching ‘wooden tray’ or ‘bed tray’ or similar :)

      Reply

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